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Find Address Candidates

Description

The findAddressCandidates operation is performed on a geocode service resource. The result of this operation is a resource representing the list of address candidates. This resource provides information about candidates, including the address, location, and match score. Locators published using ArcGIS Server 10 or later support the singleLine address field for the findAddressCandidates operation. Single-field input is easier because the address parsing is done for you; however, multifield input may provide faster responses and more precise results.

There are several options for refining or restricting search results:

  • Specify output fields to return in the geocoding response with the outFields parameter.
  • Specify the spatial reference of candidates with the outSR parameter.
  • Limit the number of candidates with the maxLocations parameter.
  • Confine the search results to a specified area with the searchExtent parameter.
  • Use the location parameter to prefer local candidates, which will then be returned higher in the candidates list.
  • Filter search results using the category parameter.
  • Specify the language of geosearch candidates with the langCode parameter.
  • Specify rooftop or street location for PointAddress candidates with the locationType parameter.
  • Choose the type of city name or street name to be included in output fields with the preferredLabelValues parameter.

New at 10.8

The preferredLabelValues parameter allows simple configuration of output fields returned in a response from the geocoding service by specifying which address component values should be included in output fields.

New parameters at 10.6

  • matchOutOfRange—Provides better spatial accuracy for inexact street addresses.
  • locationType—Specifies whether the output geometry of PointAddress matches is the rooftop point or street entrance location.
  • langCode—Specifies the language in which geocode results are returned.

New parameters at 10.3

  • maxLocations—Specifies the maximum number of locations returned by a search.
  • location—Defines an origin point that is used to boost search results for the closest address candidates.
  • distance—Specifies the radius of an area (in meters) around a point location that is used to boost the rank of geocoding candidates so that those closest to the location are returned first.
  • magicKey—A unique ID that links a suggestion to a specific address or place.
  • category—Identifies a place or address that can be used to filter the operation's results.

New parameter at 10.1

  • searchExtent—Defines a set of bounding box coordinates that limit the search area to a specific region.

New parameters at 10.0

  • outSR—Specifies the spatial reference of the x,y coordinates returned by a geocode request.
  • sourceCountry—Limits the candidates returned to the specified country or countries for either single-field or multifield requests.

Request parameters

The findAddressCandidates operation has only one required parameter: f. However, you also need to include address or place information in the request, which can be done by passing the name as a single line or as multiple fields of text. To access single-line functionality, the SingleLine parameter is required. To access multifield functionality instead, any combination of the address, neighborhood, city, region, subregion, countryCode, and postal parameters is required.

Note:

The SingleLine parameter can be combined with the sourceCountry parameter in a request. The SingleLine parameter cannot be used with any of the other multifield parameters.

ParameterDetails

address, address2, address3

(Optional)

The full street address of a place (excluding administrative divisions and postal codes) may consist of multiple components, such as building name, street, and subunit (apartment). Web forms and written correspondence typically use multiple fields or lines to designate these components. The findAddressCandidates operation supports three address parameters which can be used to represent the different components of a street address: address, address2, and address3. If you want to geocode the address Beetham Tower, 301 Deansgate, Suite 4208, Manchester, England using multiple input fields, you can set address=Beetham Tower, address2=301 Deansgate, and address3=Suite 4208.

The address parameter is a string that represents the first line of a street address. In most cases, this field will be used for street name and house number input, but it can also be used to input building name or place-name.

The address2 parameter is a string that represents the second line or a street address. This can include street name/house number, building name, place-name, or subunit.

The address3 parameter is a string that represents the third line of a street address. This can include street name/house number, building name, place-name, or subunit.

For additional example usage, see Address parameter syntax and examples.

neighborhood

(Optional)

The smallest administrative division associated with an address, typically a neighborhood or a section of a larger populated place. A neighborhood is a subdivision of a city.

Note:

The neighborhood parameter is not used in all countries or regions.

Example of a neighborhood in Mexico (colonia):

neighborhood=Herrera
city

(Optional)

The next largest administrative division associated with an address, typically a city or municipality. A city is a subdivision of a subregion or a region.

Example of a city in the United States:

city=Los Angeles
subregion

(Optional)

The next largest administrative division associated with an address. Depending on the country, a subregion can represent a county, state, or province.

Example of a subregion (department) in France:

subregion=Vienne
region

(Optional)

The largest administrative division associated with an address, typically a state or province.

Example of a region in the United States (state):

region=Florida
postal

(Optional)

The standard postal code for an address, typically a three- to six-digit alphanumeric code.

Example:

postal=92373
postalExt

(Optional)

A postal code extension, such as the United States Postal Service ZIP+4 code, which provides finer resolution or higher accuracy when also passing the postal parameter.

Example:

postalExt=1112
countryCode

(Optional)

A value representing the country in a multifield geocoding request. Providing this value increases geocoding speed. Acceptable values include the full country name in English or the official language of the country, the two-character country code, or the three-character country code. A list of supported countries and codes is available in the Geocode coverage topic.

Note:

The sourceCountry and countryCode parameters are similar but serve different purposes. The countryCode parameter defines the country value for a multifield geocode request. The sourceCountry parameter defines the country value for a request regardless of whether it is a single-field or multifield request. If both countryCode and sourceCountry are included in a findAddressCandidates request, and the country values are different, the countryCode value takes priority over sourceCountry.

Example:

countryCode=USA
singleLine

(Optional)

Specifies the location to be geocoded. This can be a street address, place-name, postal code, or point of interest (POI). The input address components must be formatted as a single string.

Caution:

The singleLine parameter should not be passed in the same request as any of the above multiline address parameters, which allow for address components to be separated into multiple parameters.

Example:

singleLine=380 New York St, Redlands, California 92373
category

(Optional)

A place or address type that can be used to filter findAddressCandidate results. This parameter supports input of single category values or multiple, comma-separated values. The category parameter can be passed either in a request with the singleLine or multilineaddress parameters. It can also be passed in a request on its own without the singleLine or multiline address parameters. See Category filtering for complete parameter details.

Note:
If more than one value is specified for the parameter, the values must be separated by a comma, with no spaces after the comma.

Example:

category=Address,Postal
outFields

(Optional)

The list of fields to be returned within the attributes object of the response. The address, location (x/y coordinates of the match location), score, extent, and spatialReference objects are returned in the response by default. If the outFields parameter is excluded from the request, or if it is included but no fields are specified, the attributes object in the corresponding response is blank.

Note:
If more than one value is specified for the parameter, the values must be separated by a comma, with no spaces after the comma.

Examples:

//Return specified fields
outFields=AddNum,StName,City

//Return all fields
outFields=*
maxLocations

(Optional)

The maximum number of locations to be returned by a search, up to the maximum number allowed by the service. If not specified, all matching candidates up to the service maximum are returned.

Example:

maxLocations=10
outSR

(Optional)

The spatial reference of the x/y coordinates returned by a geocode request. This is useful for applications using a map with a spatial reference different than that of the geocode service.

The spatial reference can be specified as either a well-known ID (WKID) or a JSON spatial reference object. If outSR is not specified, the spatial reference of the output locations is the same as that of the service. For a list of valid WKID values, see Projected coordinate systems and Geographic coordinate systems.

Example: (102100 is the WKID for the Web Mercator projection);

outSR=102100
searchExtent

(Optional)

A set of bounding box coordinates that limit the search area to a specific region. This is especially useful for applications in which a user will search for places and addresses within the current map extent.

You can specify the spatial reference of the searchExtent coordinates, which is necessary if the map spatial reference is different than that of the geocoding service; otherwise, the spatial reference of the map coordinates is assumed to be the same as that of the geocoding service.

The input can be either a comma-separated list of coordinates defining the bounding box or a JSON envelope object. The spatial reference of the bounding box coordinates can be included if an envelope object is used.

Note:
When using searchExtent coordinates, always use a period as the decimal separator, even in countries where traditionally a comma is used.

Examples:

//coordinates defining the bounding box
searchExtent=-104,35.6,-94.32,41

//JSON envelope object
searchExtent= { "xmin" : -109.55, "ymin" : 25.76, "xmax" : -86.39, "ymax" : 49.94, "spatialReference" : {"wkid" : 4326} }
location

(Optional)

Defines an origin point that is used to prefer or boost geocoding candidates based on their proximity to the location. Candidates near the location are prioritized relative to those farther away. This is useful in mobile applications where a user wants to search for places in the vicinity of their current GPS location, or in mapping applications where users want to search for places near the center of the map.

The location can be represented with a simple comma-separated syntax (x,y), or as a JSON point object. If the comma-separated syntax is used, the spatial reference of the coordinates must be the same as the spatial reference of the locator on which the geocode service is based; otherwise, the spatial reference of the point coordinates can be defined in the JSON object.

Examples:

//Simple syntax (default SR)
location=-117.196,34.056
magicKey

(Optional)

The findAddressCandidates operation retrieves results quicker when you pass in valid singleLine and magicKey values than when you don't pass in magicKey. However, to get these advantages, you need to make a prior request to suggest , which provides a magicKey.

The suggest operation is often called on to improve the user experience of search boxes by analyzing partial text and providing complete names of places, addresses, points of interest, and so on. For instance, typing Mbu in a search box offers Mbuji-Mayi, Democratic Republic of the Congo as a suggestion, so the user doesn't need to type the complete name.

Looking at the suggestion process from another perspective, as the user types, the suggest operation performs a text search, which is a redundant part of the overall search that the findAddressCandidates operation can also perform. The user chooses a place-name or type, narrowing the results to a specific record. The results from suggest include text and magicKey values that contain the information the user chose; passing these values from suggest into findAddressCandidates results in faster and more accurate operations.

In summary, using the magicKey parameter in findAddressCandidates is a two-step process:

  • Make a request to suggest. The response includes text and magicKey properties.
  • Make a request to findAddressCandidates and pass in the text and magicKey values returned from suggest as the SingleLine and magicKey input parameters, respectively. The magicKey parameter will not function correctly if passed alone. Both magicKey and SingleLine must be included in a findAddressCandidates request so the output matches the selected suggestion.

Note:
For best results, when the searchExtent and location parameters are included in a suggest request, the same parameters should be included in the corresponding findAddressCandidates request.

Example:

magicKey=JS91CYhQDS5vDPhvSMyGZby0YFbaUDoaM5bHMoFF
matchOutOfRange

(Optional)

A Boolean that specifies whether StreetAddress matches should be returned even when the input house number is outside of the house number range defined for the input street. Out of range matches have Addr_type=StreetAddressExt. The geometry of such matches is a point corresponding to the end of the street segment where the range value is closest to the input house number. If matchOutOfRange is not specified in a request, its value is set to true by default.

With matchOutOfRange, better spatial accuracy is provided for inexact street address searches. Most street segments are assigned house number ranges. For example, Main Street may include house numbers from 2-100 on one side of the street and 1-99 on the other. A user may search for a house number that is not within this range, such as 109 Main Street. If matchOutOfRange=false is passed in this request, the geocode service will return a StreetName-level match to Main Street, with geometry corresponding to the centerline of a street segment that most closely matches the input values. StreetName matches can be ambiguous because there may be multiple street segments with the same name that equally match the input. However, if matchOutOfRange=true in this case, a more precise geometry is returned to the specific side of the segment of Main Street with house number range 1-99.

Note:
Input house numbers that exceed the range on a street segment by more than 100 will not result in StreetAddressExt matches. For streets with smaller house number ranges, the maxOutOfRange tolerance is less than 100.

Values: true | false

locationType

(Optional)

Specifies whether the output geometry of PointAddress and Subaddress matches should be the rooftop point or street entrance location. Valid values are rooftop and street. The default value is rooftop.

Geocode results include one geometry object (the location object) that defines the location of the address, as well as two sets of X/Y coordinate values within the attributes object: X/Y, and DisplayX/DisplayY. In most cases, for geocode results with Addr_type=PointAddress or Subaddress, the X/Y attribute values describe the coordinates of the address along the street, while the DisplayX/DisplayY values describe the rooftop, or building centroid, coordinates. By default, the geometry returned for geocode results represents the rooftop location of the address (if the rooftop location is available in the source data). This is useful for most spatial analysis and map display purposes. However, for routing scenarios, it may be desirable to use the street location because the rooftop location of some addresses may be offset from a street by a large distance. For these cases, the locationType parameter can be used to specify that the street entrance geometry should be returned.

It is important to note that locationType is limited by the address data sources used to build the locator for the geocoding service. Not all PointAddress and Subaddress features include rooftop and street location coordinates. For some addresses, only a rooftop location is available; for others, only a street location is provided by the data source. For cases such as this, the locationType parameter may not function as expected. For example, if only rooftop location coordinates are available for an address, the rooftop geometry will be returned for the geocoded address even when locationType=street

is requested.

Note:

The locationType parameter only affects the location object in the geocode JSON response. It does not change the X/Y or DisplayX/DisplayY attribute values.

Values: street | rooftop

langCode

(Optional)

Sets the language in which geocode results are returned. Addresses and places in many countries are available in more than one language; in these cases, the langCode parameter can be used to specify which language should be used for results returned by the findAddressCandidates operation. This is useful for ensuring that results are returned in the expected language. For example, a web application could be designed to get the browser language and pass it as the langCode parameter value in a findAddressCandidates request.

See the table of supported countries for valid language code values in each country. Full language names cannot be used in the langCode parameter. Only one language code value can be included for the langCode parameter in a findAddressCandidates request.

If the langCode parameter isn't included in a request, or if it is included but there are no matching features with the input language code, the resultant match is returned in the language code of the primary matched component from the input search string. Typically, this is either place-name or street name, depending on the search string.

It is important to note that langCode is limited by the address data sources used to build the locator for the geocoding service. This parameter will be ignored when not supported by the data.

Example:

langCode=fr
sourceCountry

(Optional)

Limits the candidates returned by the findAddressCandidates operation to the specified country or countries for either single-field or multifield requests. For example, if sourceCountry=USA is included in the request, it is assumed that the address is in the United States, so only matching addresses in USA are returned. Using this parameter prevents potential unexpected results in other countries for ambiguous searches.

Acceptable values include the three-character country code. A list of supported countries and codes is available in Geocode coverage. Multiple country codes can be specified to limit results to more than one country.

Note:

The sourceCountry and countryCode parameters are similar but serve different purposes. The countryCode parameter defines the country value for a multifield geocode request. The sourceCountry parameter defines the country value for a request regardless of whether it is a single-field or multifield request. If both countryCode and sourceCountry are included in a findAddressCandidates request, and the country values are different, the countryCode value takes priority over sourceCountry.

Note:
If more than one value is specified for the parameter, the values must be separated by a comma, with no spaces after the comma.

Example:

sourceCountry=FRA,DEU,ESP
preferredLabelValues

(Optional)

Allows simple configuration of output fields returned in a response from the geocoding service by specifying which address component values should be included in output fields. Supports a single value or a comma-delimited collection of values as input. If the parameter is blank or excluded from a request, default address label formats will be used.

A particular address may have multiple city names associated with it. In the United States for example, all addresses have a ZIP code (postal code) assigned to them. Each ZIP code has one or more associated locality names, which are known as postal cities. There is always one primary postal city value for each ZIP code. ZIP codes typically have no set boundaries, and the primary postal city name for the ZIP code that is assigned to an address may be different than the name of the local city that the address is within.

Note:

In the context of the preferredLabelValues parameter, the name of the city whose boundary an address is within is referred to as the "local" city, as opposed to the "postal" city name assigned to the address's postal code.

Additional details:

  • The preferredLabelValues parameter takes a comma-delimited collection of values as input.
  • The parameter values correspond to two groups: a City group and a Street group, indicated by the suffix of the value name. The postalCity, localCity, and matchedCity values are part of the City group. The primaryStreet and matchedStreet values are part of the Street group.
  • A geocode request can include one City value and one Street value, for instance: preferredLabelValues=primaryStreet,postalCity.
  • A request can only include one value per group. In other words, a request with preferredLabelValues=matchedCity,postalCity is invalid.

Note:
The functionality of the preferredLabelValues parameter is limited by the data sources used to produce the locator on which the geocoding service is based. Not all addresses have postal city and local city values assigned to them. Likewise, only certain streets may include primary and alternate names. If the preferredLabelValues parameter is used and the output labels don't correspond to expectations in some cases, it is likely because the expected values aren't included in the source data for the addresses.

Example:

preferredLabelValues=matchedCity,primaryStreet
f

(Required)

The response format. The default response format is html.

Values: html | json |pjson| kmz

Search for street addresses

You can search for a street address, street name, or street intersection using the findAddressCandidates operation. For best results, you should include as much location information as possible in the search in addition to the street address.

You can pass the address components in a single parameter or separated into multiple parameters. Examples of each are shown. Note that in each case, the JSON response is the name for both the single- and multiple-parameter requests.

Example: Find a street address (380 New York Street, Redlands, CA 92373)

Single-field request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?SingleLine=380%20New%20York%20Street%2C%20Redlands%2C%20CA%2092373&category=&outFields=*&forStorage=false&f=pjson

Multifield request URL

Note:
In this example, the street address component (380 New York St) is passed as the value for the address parameter, the city component (Redlands) as the value for the city parameter, the state component (CA) as the region parameter, and the ZIP Code (92373) as the value for the postal parameter. Also in this example, all possible output fields are returned (outFields=*), even if they don't contain a value.

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?Address=380%20new%20york%20st&City=redlands&Region=CA&Postal=92373&outFields=*&forStorage=false&f=pjson

JSON response

{
 "spatialReference": {
  "wkid": 4326,
  "latestWkid": 4326
 },
 "candidates": [
  {
   "address": "380 New York St, Redlands, California, 92373",
   "location": {
    "x": -117.19487199429184,
    "y": 34.057237000231282
   },
   "score": 100,
   "attributes": {
    "Loc_name": "World",
    "Status": "M",
    "Score": 100,
    "Match_addr": "380 New York St, Redlands, California, 92373",
    "LongLabel": "380 New York St, Redlands, CA, 92373, USA",
    "ShortLabel": "380 New York St",
    "Addr_type": "PointAddress",
    "Type": "",
    "PlaceName": "",
    "Place_addr": "380 New York St, Redlands, California, 92373",
    "Phone": "",
    "URL": "",
    "Rank": 20,
    "AddBldg": "",
    "AddNum": "380",
    "AddNumFrom": "",
    "AddNumTo": "",
    "AddRange": "",
    "Side": "",
    "StPreDir": "",
    "StPreType": "",
    "StName": "New York",
    "StType": "St",
    "StDir": "",
    "BldgType": "",
    "BldgName": "",
    "LevelType": "",
    "LevelName": "",
    "UnitType": "",
    "UnitName": "",
    "SubAddr": "",
    "StAddr": "380 New York St",
    "Block": "",
    "Sector": "",
    "Nbrhd": "",
    "District": "",
    "City": "Redlands",
    "MetroArea": "",
    "Subregion": "San Bernardino County",
    "Region": "California",
    "RegionAbbr": "CA",
    "Territory": "",
    "Zone": "",
    "Postal": "92373",
    "PostalExt": "",
    "Country": "USA",
    "LangCode": "ENG",
    "Distance": 0,
    "X": -117.19568252432872,
    "Y": 34.057237000231282,
    "DisplayX": -117.19487199429184,
    "DisplayY": 34.057237000231282,
    "Xmin": -117.19587199429185,
    "Xmax": -117.19387199429184,
    "Ymin": 34.056237000231285,
    "Ymax": 34.05823700023128,
    "ExInfo": ""
   },
   "extent": {
    "xmin": -117.19587199429185,
    "ymin": 34.056237000231285,
    "xmax": -117.19387199429184,
    "ymax": 34.05823700023128
   }
  }
 ]
}

Search for intersections

An intersection is where two streets cross each other. An intersection search consists of the intersecting street names plus the containing administrative division or postal code. For example, redlands blvd and new york st 92373 is a valid intersection search, as is redlands blvd & new york st redlands ca. For street intersection matches, Addr_type=StreetInt.

Note:
The valid intersection connectors can be modified in the locator's properties prior to publishing the service.

There are several types of intersections that can be found. A typical simple intersection is formed by two street segments crossing each other. An example of this is W Park Ave and Tennessee St, Redlands, CA.

Example: Find a simple street intersection (W Park Ave and Tennessee St, Redlands, CA)

Simple intersection example

Single-field request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?f=pjson&outFields=Addr_type&forStorage=false&SingleLine=W%20Park%20Ave%20and%20Tennessee%20St,%20Redlands,%20CA

Multifield request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?f=pjson&outFields=Addr_type&forStorage=false&Address=W%20Park%20Ave%20and%20Tennessee%20St&City=Redlands&Region=CA

JSON response

{
 "spatialReference": {
  "wkid": 4326,
  "latestWkid": 4326
 },
 "candidates": [
  {
   "address": "W Park Ave & Tennessee St, Redlands, California, 92373",
   "location": {
    "x": -117.20007992219183,
    "y": 34.059230049168335
   },
   "score": 100,
   "attributes": {
    "Addr_type": "StreetInt"
   },
   "extent": {
    "xmin": -117.20107992219184,
    "ymin": 34.058230049168337,
    "xmax": -117.19907992219183,
    "ymax": 34.060230049168332
   }
  }
 ]
}

You can also find intersections between streets that aren't physically connected. This includes cases where streets are separated by elevation, such as a highway overpass crossing over another street. An example of this is Pacific Hwy and W Washington St, San Diego, CA 92140, which is the intersection of a highway overpass and the street below.

Highway overpass intersection example

An intersection can also be formed by two disconnected streets when one street ends close to another, such as a cul-de-sac or a dead end. In cases such as this, if the streets are within a certain distance of each other, the geocode service returns a StreetInt match when they are searched for. This near-intersection tolerance is currently 60 meters. An example of this type of near-intersection is Rua Ferdinando Ferreira @ Avenida Comendador Franco, Curitiba, BRA.

Near-intersection example

Another type of supported disconnected intersection occurs at roundabouts. A roundabout is formed when two or more streets connect to a circular roadway, which is often unnamed. The participating streets typically don't connect directly to each other, but when they are searched for and are within the near-intersection tolerance, the service returns a StreetInt match. An example of a roundabout intersection is Rue Jean Laurent & Avenue Jean Mermoz, Le Vésinet, FRA.

Roundabout intersection example

Sometimes there may be multiple possible matches for an intersection search. This typically occurs when divided roads cross each other. A divided road consists of two street segments separated by a median. In a scenario such as this, there could be up to four equivalent intersection matches consisting of the same street names at different locations. Geocoding uses an ambiguous intersection tolerance with such searches to remove redundant intersection candidates from the response. The ambiguous intersection tolerance is currently 30 meters. Specifically, if there are multiple intersection candidates with the same street names and different locations, and if they are within 30 meters of each other, the service returns only one of the candidates. An example of an ambiguous intersection search is Cambie St and W King Edward Ave, Vancouver, British Columbia. In this case, there are three potential intersection candidates with the same street names. Because the locations are within the ambiguous intersection tolerance, only one intersection candidate is returned.

Ambiguous intersection example

Search for POIs

A POI is a point location that can represent a cultural or geographic landmark, business, or administrative division. For example, you can find amusement parks, museums, schools, restaurants, hotels, gas stations, or other types of businesses or landmarks; geographic features, such as mountains, lakes, rivers, or deserts; or administrative places, such as neighborhoods, cities, states, counties, or countries. The findAddressCandidates operation supports geocoding POIs by name or by type.

Note:
The supported types will depend on the data on which your locator was built.

As with street addresses, you can search for POIs with findAddressCandidates using the single-field or multifield approach.

Single-field POI search

To search for POIs with single-field search, use the SingleLine parameter. In general, valid SingleLine POI search strings can be formatted in variations of three basic structures:

  1. <name or type> <optional connector> <zone>
  2. <zone> <name or type>
  3. <name or type> <address> <zone>

Where

  • <name or type> = A place-name, such as Disneyland, Starbucks, or Niagara Falls; or a type, such as amusement parks, waterfalls, or coffee shops.
  • <zone> = A postal code or administrative boundary—such as neighborhood, city, subregion, region, country, or any combination thereof—that provides a spatial boundary to the search. It can be included in the search to limit matching candidates but is not required.
  • <optional connector> = in or at; this is not required for the search.
  • <address> = A street name, such as Main St, or a complete street address, such as 590 N Main St.

Examples of valid SingleLine search strings include the following:

Business name searches

  • Starbucks San Diego
  • Starbucks in San Diego
  • San Diego Starbucks
  • Starbucks 92101
  • Starbucks 5th Ave San Diego
  • Reuben H Fleet Science Center, 1875 El Prado, San Diego, CA, 92101, USA

Type searches

  • coffee shops San Diego
  • coffee shops in San Diego CA
  • San Diego coffee shops
  • coffee shops 92101
  • coffee shops 5th Ave San Diego

Multifield POI search

When searching for POIs using multifield input, the name or type of the POI must be passed as the value for the address parameter. The zone information can be passed in the postal, neighborhood, city, subregion, region, and countryCode parameters. If searching for POI and address, the address should be passed as the value for the address2 parameter.

General information

It is important to note that instead of providing a zone, you can limit searches to a specific area by using the searchExtent. You can also influence the sorting of match candidates according to their proximity to a location with the location parameter.

As with address searches, the quality of POI search results is dependent on the amount and quality of information in the search string. If you only search for hotels without qualifying information, such as zone, search extent, or location, your results will not be meaningful. Adding supplemental information to the search string—the more specific the better—will result in more accurate and relevant matches.

Note:

There may be instances when searches yield unexpected results. For example, a search for New York pizza, where the expected results are pizzerias in New York City, may instead return a match to a restaurant named New York Pizza in Sacramento, California. This is because exact place-name matches are given higher priority to increase performance. If this occurs, you can obtain the desired results by modifying the search string—in this case, a search for pizza in NYC should yield the expected results.

Note:

If your data includes the address, phone number, and website URL of a POI, those fields can be returned by including outFields=Place_addr,Phone,URL in the request.

Example: Find a business name (Starbucks Sydney, AUS)

Single-field request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?SingleLine=starbucks%20sydney%20AUS&outFields=type,city,region&maxLocations=1&forStorage=false&f=pjson

Multifield request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?Address=starbucks&Neighborhood=&City=sydney&Subregion=&Region=&CountryCode=AUS&outFields=type,city,region&maxLocations=1&forStorage=false&f=pjson

{
 "spatialReference": {
  "wkid": 4326,
  "latestWkid": 4326
 },
 "candidates": [
  {
   "address": "Starbucks",
   "location": {
    "x": 151.20555000000002,
    "y": -33.86513999999994
   },
   "score": 100,
   "attributes": {
    "type": "Coffee Shop",
    "city": "Sydney",
    "region": "New South Wales"
   },
   "extent": {
    "xmin": 151.20055000000002,
    "ymin": -33.870139999999942,
    "xmax": 151.21055000000001,
    "ymax": -33.860139999999937
   }
  }
 ]
}

Search for administrative place-names

The findAddressCandidates operation supports single-field and multifield searches for administrative place-names. This includes searches for neighborhoods, cities, counties, states, provinces, or countries.

Example: Find a city name (London)

Single-field request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?SingleLine=London&forStorage=false&f=pjson

Multifield request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?address=London&f=pjson

{
 "spatialReference": {
  "wkid": 4326,
  "latestWkid": 4326
 },
 "candidates": [
  {
   "address": "London, England",
   "location": {
    "x": -0.1272099999999341,
    "y": 51.506420000000048
   },
   "score": 100,
   "attributes": {
    
   },
   "extent": {
    "xmin": -0.4402099999999341,
    "ymin": 51.193420000000046,
    "xmax": 0.1857900000000659,
    "ymax": 51.819420000000051
   }
  },
  {
   "address": "London, Ontario",
   "location": {
    "x": -81.246239999999943,
    "y": 42.986900000000048
   },
   "score": 100,
   "attributes": {
    
   },
   "extent": {
    "xmin": -81.379239999999939,
    "ymin": 42.853900000000046,
    "xmax": -81.113239999999948,
    "ymax": 43.119900000000051
   }
  },

Search for postal codes

The findAddressCandidates operation supports searches for postal codes and postal code extensions. When searching for postal codes, it is important to note that the same code can be valid in more than one country; for best results, it may be necessary to include additional information with the postal code, such as city or country.

Example: Find a postal code (20002 USA)

Single-field request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?singleLine=20002%20USA&outFields=addr_type&f=pjson

Multifield request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?postal=20002&countryCode=USA&outFields=addr_type&f=pjson

{
 "spatialReference": {
  "wkid": 4326,
  "latestWkid": 4326
 },
 "candidates": [
  {
   "address": "20002, Washington, District of Columbia",
   "location": {
    "x": -76.989979999999946,
    "y": 38.897450000000049
   },
   "score": 100,
   "attributes": {
    "addr_type": "Postal"
   },
   "extent": {
    "xmin": -77.036979999999943,
    "ymin": 38.850450000000052,
    "xmax": -76.942979999999949,
    "ymax": 38.944450000000046
   }
  }
 ]
}

Search for coordinates

Locators built with the Create Locator tool support searches for coordinates. The output is a geometry point with a match address that is the same as the input coordinates. This is different than reverse geocoding, in which input x/y coordinates are resolved to a matching street address. The following types of coordinate search are supported:

  • x/y coordinates; x refers to longitude (east-west coordinates), and y refers to latitude (north-south coordinates).
  • Military Grid Reference System (MGRS) coordinates.
  • United States National Grid (USNG) coordinates.

Note:

Coordinates must be passed as the value for the SingleLine or Address field in the request. If the coordinates are included in the Address field, all other input fields, such as Address2, City, Region, and Postal, must be empty.

Example: Find MGRS / USNG coordinates (18SUH6789043210)

Single-field request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?f=pjson&outFields=Addr_type&maxLocations=1&forStorage=false&SingleLine=18SUH6789043210

Multifield request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?f=pjson&outFields=Addr_type&maxLocations=1&forStorage=false&Address=18SUH6789043210

JSON response

{
 "spatialReference": {
  "wkid": 4326,
  "latestWkid": 4326
 },
 "candidates": [
  {
   "address": "18SUH6789043210",
   "location": {
    "x": -76.511416672563271,
    "y": 38.327287449633403
   },
   "score": 100,
   "attributes": {
    "Addr_type": "MGRS"
   },
   "extent": {
    "xmin": -76.512416672563276,
    "ymin": 38.326287449633405,
    "xmax": -76.510416672563267,
    "ymax": 38.3282874496334
   }
  }
 ]
}

Input x/y coordinates can be formatted in several ways:

  • Coordinates can be input in either <longitude>,<latitude> or <latitude>,<longitude> order, and can be separated with either a comma or a space.
  • Coordinates can be input in decimal degrees (DD) or degrees minutes seconds (DMS) format.
  • Quadrants can be signified by using a minus sign (-) before the numeric value to signify the western or southern quadrants, or by using E, W, N, or S directional indicators before or after the numeric values.
  • DMS coordinates can be separated with ° (degrees), ' (minutes), and " (seconds) symbols.
    Note:

    Some different forms of minute and second symbols may be supported, but in general, it is best to use the apostrophe (') and quotation mark (") symbols shown here.

  • DMS coordinates can also be separated with the letters d (degrees), m (minutes), and s (seconds).

Specify output fields

The findAddressCandidates operation allows you to specify individual output fields or return all output fields. The outFields parameter is used for this. To return all supported output fields, set outFields=*; if you only want to return the default output fields, outFields does not need to be passed in the request. To return specific fields, pass the desired field names as comma-separated values, such as outFields=PlaceName,Type,City,Country, which returns the name, feature type, city, and country for a POI search.

Example: Specify individual outfields for a POI search (PlaceName,Type,City,Country)

Single-field request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?singleLine=coffee%20shops%20austin&outFields=PlaceName,Type,City,Country&f=pjson

JSON response

{
 "spatialReference": {
  "wkid": 4326,
  "latestWkid": 4326
 },
 "candidates": [
  {
   "address": "Starbucks",
   "location": {
    "x": -97.805182999999943,
    "y": 30.476892000000078
   },
   "score": 100,
   "attributes": {
    "Type": "Coffee Shop",
    "PlaceName": "Starbucks",
    "City": "Austin",
    "Country": "USA"
   },
   "extent": {
    "xmin": -97.806182999999947,
    "ymin": 30.475892000000076,
    "xmax": -97.804182999999938,
    "ymax": 30.477892000000079
   }
  },

Specify the output spatial reference

By default, your geocode service returns candidate geometry in the spatial reference of the data on which it was built. You can specify a different spatial reference for output coordinates by using the outSR parameter. This is necessary if you have a mapping application in which you display geocoding candidates and the map spatial reference is not the same as the reference data of your locator. For example, the ArcGIS.com basemaps use a Web Mercator spatial reference, with coordinates in meters. To display geocoding candidates correctly in such a map, you would need to set outSR=102100, which is the well-known ID (WKID) of the Web Mercator spatial reference.

For a list of valid WKID values, see Projected coordinate systems and Geographic coordinate systems.

Example: Specify output coordinates in Web Mercator spatial reference (380 new york st redlands ca)

Single-field request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?singleLine=380%20new%20york%20st%20redlands%20ca&outSR=102100&f=pjson

Multifield request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?address=380%20new%20york%20st&city=redlands&region=ca&outSR=102100&f=pjson

JSON response

{
 "spatialReference": {
  "wkid": 102100,
  "latestWkid": 3857
 },
 "candidates": [
  {
   "address": "380 New York St, Redlands, California, 92373",
   "location": {
    "x": -13046073.473987445,
    "y": 4036490.1486023655
   },
   "score": 100,
   "attributes": {
    
   },
   "extent": {
    "xmin": -13046184.793478239,
    "ymin": 4036355.7832219717,
    "xmax": -13045962.154496653,
    "ymax": 4036624.5155679826
   }
  },

Specify the maximum number of candidates

The maxLocations parameter allows you to specify the maximum number of candidates to be returned by a search, up to the maximum number of candidates allowed by the geocoding service. As an example, if you set maxLocations=10, findAddressCandidates will return the top 10 candidates for the search. If no value is specified for maxLocations, findAddressCandidates returns all matching candidates.

Example: Specify the maximum number of candidates for a POI search (Starbucks in San Diego)

Single-field request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?singleLine=starbucks%20in%20san%20diego&outFields=PlaceName,City,Country&maxLocations=2&f=pjson

Multifield request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?address=starbucks&city=san%20diego&outFields=PlaceName,City,Country&maxLocations=2&f=pjson

JSON response

{
 "spatialReference": {
  "wkid": 4326,
  "latestWkid": 4326
 },
 "candidates": [
  {
   "address": "Starbucks",
   "location": {
    "x": -117.25457299999999,
    "y": 32.794458000000077
   },
   "score": 100,
   "attributes": {
    "PlaceName": "Starbucks",
    "City": "San Diego",
    "Country": "USA"
   },
   "extent": {
    "xmin": -117.255573,
    "ymin": 32.793458000000079,
    "xmax": -117.25357299999999,
    "ymax": 32.795458000000075
   }
  },
  {
   "address": "Starbucks",
   "location": {
    "x": -117.25463599999995,
    "y": 32.794477000000029
   },
   "score": 100,
   "attributes": {
    "PlaceName": "Starbucks",
    "City": "San Diego",
    "Country": "USA"
   },
   "extent": {
    "xmin": -117.25563599999995,
    "ymin": 32.793477000000031,
    "xmax": -117.25363599999994,
    "ymax": 32.795477000000027
   }
  }
 ]
}

Search within an extent

The findAddressCandidates operation allows spatial filtering of search results by using the searchExtent parameter. To confine a search to a localized area, something that is especially useful in a mobile application, you can define a bounding rectangle to search within. No candidates outside of the rectangle are returned. Bounding rectangle coordinates can be entered as a simple comma-separated string in the format <lower left corner>,<upper right corner>. If the simple format is used, the coordinates must be in the default spatial reference of the geocode service, which is the same as the data upon which it was built. The searchExtent parameter can be used with all supported search types (street address, POI, admin place, postal code).

Note:

The searchExtent parameter is not intended to be used with extents that cover large areas, such as entire countries or provinces/states. Geocoding quality and performance may be reduced with large searchExtent values. For example, if a request includes a searchExtent that covers the state of California, an ambiguous input address such as 100 Main St would cause an excessive number of matching candidates to be generated, which would slow down the response. To counteract such a delay, the service may not process all possible candidates, leading to unexpected results.

The following best practices will help you avoid issues when using searchExtent:

  • Reduce the searchExtent area. Ideally, the size of the extent should not exceed an area corresponding to a map scale of approximately 1:1,000,000.
  • Include an administrative zone (such as city) or postal code in the request when searching for a place or address. For instance, instead of searching for 100 Main St, be more specific and search for 100 Main St, Barstow.
  • Use the suggest operation together with findAddressCandidates to take advantage of its autocomplete capability.

Example: Find POIs using searchExtent with default spatial reference (McDonald's)

Single-field request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?singleLine=mcdonalds&outFields=city,type&searchExtent=-117.172026,32.706517,-117.152498,32.725514&f=pjson

Multifield request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?address=mcdonalds&outFields=city,type&searchExtent=-117.172026,32.706517,-117.152498,32.725514&f=pjson

{
 "spatialReference": {
  "wkid": 4326,
  "latestWkid": 4326
 },
 "candidates": [
  {
   "address": "McDonald's",
   "location": {
    "x": -117.15405899999996,
    "y": 32.718697000000077
   },
   "score": 100,
   "attributes": {
    "type": "Fast Food",
    "city": "San Diego"
   },
   "extent": {
    "xmin": -117.15505899999997,
    "ymin": 32.717697000000079,
    "xmax": -117.15305899999996,
    "ymax": 32.719697000000075
   }
  }
 ]
}

You can specify a spatial reference for the searchExtent, which is necessary if your map uses a different spatial reference than the geocode service. For example, the default ArcGIS.com basemaps use a Web Mercator spatial reference (WKID = 102100), with coordinates in meters. The searchExtent must be passed as a JSON envelope object if the coordinates are in a spatial reference other than that of the geocode service.

Requests that include searchExtent can also include zone information (that is, city, state, and country). If the extent defined for searchExtent is large enough to encompass multiple cities, it may be necessary to include the city name in the search to achieve optimal results. For example, if the searchExtent covers the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan region, and you search for Starbucks, there could be matches returned in Dallas or Fort Worth or any of their suburbs. If you specifically want to find Starbucks in Garland, for example, this needs to be specified in the search.

You can also search for street addresses within an extent. When the searchExtent parameter is defined for an address search, city and postal code can be omitted from the search and valid matches can still be found. However, if the searchExtent is large, it is possible for a street address to occur multiple times within the extent, and it may be necessary to refine the search by including city, state, postal code, or other distinguishing information. Additionally, if the search includes a city or postal code that is outside the searchExtent, no matches will be returned.

Proximity searches

Geocoding results are typically sorted according to their relevance to the search and their relative importance. However, with some applications, especially mobile apps, users are more concerned with finding features closest to their current location. For this reason, the findAddressCandidates operation supports prioritization of candidates based on their distance from a specified point. By passing in the location parameter, you can define an area of influence for your searches. The location value represents the center point of the area, which spans a radius of 50,000 meters. Features closest to the input location show up higher in the list of candidates. Results that are within the area of influence area receive a greater boost than those outside the area.

It is important to note that proximity search does not filter results that are farther than 50,000 meters from the input location—it is intended to influence the sort order of results so the most locationally relevant candidates are returned first. For instance, if your location is in Las Vegas, and you search for Golden Nugget, the first candidate is Golden Nugget in Las Vegas. The second is Golden Nugget in Biloxi, Mississippi. So even though Golden Nugget in Biloxi is much farther away than the 50,000 meters, it is still returned because it is the second most relevant (closest) candidate. In general, the number of candidates returned by a proximity search is only limited by the maxLocations parameter.

Note:

The location parameter can be used in place of administrative zone (city) or postal code in an address search, as long as a matching address exists within 50 kilometers of the input location. Consider the following example.

  • 251 Vesey St, New York, 10282 is an address in Manhattan, New York City.
  • Coordinates -74.006,40.71437 represent a point within central Manhattan, less than one kilometer away from the address.

If you search for 251 Vesey St (no city or postal) with location=-74.006,40.71437 included in the request, a match to 251 Vesey St, New York, 10282 is returned. However, if instead you search for 251 Vesey St with a location value in Washington, DC (350 kilometers away) an address match is not returned.

Example: Find a place-name using a proximity search (Golden Nugget)

Single-field request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?singleLine=golden%20nugget&outFields=City,Region,Country&maxLocations=10&location=-115.172783,36.114789&f=pjson

Multifield request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?address=golden%20nugget&outFields=City,Region,Country&maxLocations=10&location=-115.172783,36.114789&f=pjson

JSON response

{
 "spatialReference": {
  "wkid": 4326,
  "latestWkid": 4326
 },
 "candidates": [
  {
   "address": "Golden Nugget",
   "location": {
    "x": -115.14472999999998,
    "y": 36.170330000000035
   },
   "score": 100,
   "attributes": {
    "City": "Las Vegas",
    "Region": "Nevada",
    "Country": "USA"
   },
   "extent": {
    "xmin": -115.14972999999998,
    "ymin": 36.165330000000033,
    "xmax": -115.13972999999999,
    "ymax": 36.175330000000038
   }
  },
  {
   "address": "Golden Nugget",
   "location": {
    "x": -88.860549999999989,
    "y": 30.39047000000005
   },
   "score": 100,
   "attributes": {
    "City": "Biloxi",
    "Region": "Mississippi",
    "Country": "USA"
   },
   "extent": {
    "xmin": -88.865549999999985,
    "ymin": 30.385470000000051,
    "xmax": -88.855549999999994,
    "ymax": 30.395470000000049
   }
  },

If you only want to return candidates within a specific area, and sort the candidates according to their proximity to a location, you need to define a search extent by passing the searchExtent parameter in the request along with the location parameter. Consider the Golden Nugget example again. If your location is in Las Vegas and you want to confine your search results to places named Golden Nugget that are within the map extent, you would need to construct a request with the following parameters:

  • SingleLine (or address): Golden Nugget
  • location: -115.144989,36.167361
  • searchExtent: -115.161912,36.158764,-115.126925,36.179793

Category filtering

The findAddressCandidates operation supports filtering searches by category values, which represent address and place types. By including the category parameter in a findAddressCandidates request, you can avoid false positive matches to unexpected place and address types due to ambiguous searches.

For example, a user may search for June, expecting the service to match to June Mountain ski resort. However, there are many places in the world named June, so the search returns several cities named June.

The solution for this case is to pass the category

parameter in the request. By including category=Ski Resort in the request, all places that are not ski resorts are bypassed by the search, and only ski resorts whose names begin with June are returned.

Example: Search for June with category=Ski Resort

Request URL

https://[myServerURL]/arcgis/rest/services/[myGeocodeServiceName]/GeocodeServer/findAddressCandidates?singleLine=June&category=Ski%20Resort&outFields=PlaceName,Type,Place_Addr,City,Region&maxLocations=5&forStorage=false&f=pjson

{
 "spatialReference": {
  "wkid": 4326,
  "latestWkid": 4326
 },
 "candidates": [
  {
   "address": "June Mountain",
   "location": {
    "x": -119.08940999999999,
    "y": 37.770690000000059
   },
   "score": 90.709999999999994,
   "attributes": {
    "Type": "Ski Resort",
    "PlaceName": "June Mountain",
    "Place_Addr": "3819 CA-158, June Lake, California, 93529",
    "City": "June Lake",
    "Region": "California"
   },
   "extent": {
    "xmin": -119.09440999999998,
    "ymin": 37.765690000000056,
    "xmax": -119.08440999999999,
    "ymax": 37.775690000000061
   }
  }
 ]
}