Editor widget with configurations

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This sample demonstrates how to add an Editor widget to a web application. This widget is useful as it provides an out-of-the-box experience to help streamline the editing experience within an application. This sample makes use of the Editor widget by providing both create and update workflow functionality for the map's editable layers.

For a more basic sample, see Edit features with the Editor widget.

How it works

The widget automatically recognizes if there are any editable feature layer(s) within the map. If there are, the layer or layers will display within the widget. Based on the editing functionality set on the feature layer, you can update and/or create new features. These two workflows can be adjusted to what is needed within the application. For example, let's say you have a feature layer that has full editing capabilities set on it. But for one specific application, you may not need or want the editor to create any new features. You can restrict this by setting addEnabled: false in the layerInfos property. This will disable feature creation.

In addition to this, it is also possible to limit what fields are displayed and how you wish to display them. You can do this by setting the fieldConfig[] property within the layerInfos property. This sample makes use of this since there are only a few attribute fields that need to be updated.

                                          
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// Loop through webmap layers and set an EditConfig for each
view.map.layers.forEach((layer) => {
  if (layer.title === "Police Routes") {
    editConfigPoliceLayer = {
      layer: layer,
      // Set it so that only one field displays within the form
      fieldConfig: [
        {
          name: "PatrolType",
          label: "Patrol Type"
        }
      ]
    };
  } else {
    // Specify a few of the fields to edit within the form
    editConfigCrimeLayer = {
      layer: layer,
      fieldConfig: [
        {
          name: "fulladdr",
          label: "Full Address"
        },
        {
          name: "neighborhood",
          label: "Neighborhood"
        },
        {
          name: "ucrdesc",
          label: "UCR Description"
        },
        {
          name: "crimecategory",
          label: "Category"
        },
        {
          name: "casestatus",
          label: "Status"
        }
      ]
    };
  }
});

The Editor widget encapsulates the functionality seen in the FeatureTemplates, FeatureForm, and Sketch widgets. It is possible to customize some of these widgets' properties by setting the supportingWidgetDefaults property. In addition to customizing how the fields display within the Editor, you can also customize how the default FeatureTemplates display. By default, the Editor widget shows all the layers' templates in one group. To make it easier to distinguish, this sample makes use of a custom function created to help group these templates. In this example, the default behavior of the FeatureTemplates widget is customized to work with this custom grouping function.

                          
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// Create a custom group to separate the different areas of crime.
// This function takes a 'grouping' object containing a feature template and feature layer.

function customGroup(grouping) {
  // If the layer is 'Police routes', do not group
  let groupHeading = "Police Routes";
  if (grouping.layer.title.toLowerCase() === "crime map") {
    switch (grouping.template.name) {
      case "Criminal Homicide":
      case "Rape":
      case "Robbery":
      case "Aggravated Assault":
        groupHeading = "Violent Crime";
        break;
      case "Arson":
      case "Burglary":
      case "Larceny":
      case "Motor Vehicle Theft":
        groupHeading = "Property Crime";
        break;
      default:
        groupHeading = "Quality of Life";
    }
  }
  return groupHeading;
}

Like other widgets, the Editor widget uses the same type of coding pattern, i.e. you must set the view referenced by the widget. After this, the other properties can be set as the application's requirements dictate.

           
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const editor = new Editor({
  view: view,
  // Pass in the configurations.
  layerInfos: [editConfigCrimeLayer, editConfigPoliceLayer],
  // Override the default template behavior of the Editor widget
  supportingWidgetDefaults: {
    featureTemplates: {
      groupBy: customGroup
    }
  }
});

Configure snapping

It is also possible to configure snapping within the Editor widget. This is handled via the snappingOptions property. Since the Editor does not yet provide a UI to configure snapping capabilities, this sample contains checkbox input elements to toggle snapping functionality on/off, and to specify if snapping should be limited to self or feature snapping.

Checking "Snapping enabled" is equivalent to setting the snappingOptions.enabled to true. Once this is enabled, you can then choose the type of snapping needed in your application, i.e. self or feature. In addition, you can also use the CTRL key to dynamically toggle snapping on/off.

The UI is wired up to watch when snappingOptions.enabled changes. By default, it is turned off (false). If checked, the associated self and feature enabled snapping configuration checkboxes also turn on. These can be toggled depending upon what is needed. Also, if feature snapping is disabled, the associated feature snapping layer sources are also disabled.

If no UI is wanted, snapping can still be configured. Instead of using the provided checkbox UI, set the Editor's snappingOptions and toggle snapping by using the CTRL key. The following code snippet demonstrates and example of how to configure the SnappingOptions in the Editor widget, and the following snippet is also provided as a comment block in the sample.

       
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//Toggling snapping on/off can be achieved via the CTRL key.
snappingOptions: { // autocasts to SnappingOptions
  enabled: true,
  selfEnabled: true,
  featureEnabled: true,
  featureSources: [{ layer: crimeLayer}, {layer: policeLayer }] // layer sources for feature snapping
}

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