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HillshadeRenderer Class

  • HillshadeRenderer
  • class Esri::ArcGISRuntime::HillshadeRenderer

    A hillshade raster renderer. More...

    Header: #include <HillshadeRenderer>
    Since: Esri::ArcGISRuntime 100.0
    Inherits: Esri::ArcGISRuntime::RasterRenderer
    Inherited By:

    Esri::ArcGISRuntime::BlendRenderer

    This class was introduced in Esri::ArcGISRuntime 100.0.

    Public Functions

    HillshadeRenderer(double altitude, double azimuth, double zFactor, Esri::ArcGISRuntime::SlopeType slopeType, double pixelSizeFactor, double pixelSizePower, int outputBitDepth, QObject *parent = nullptr)
    HillshadeRenderer(double altitude, double azimuth, double zFactor, QObject *parent = nullptr)
    HillshadeRenderer(QObject *parent = nullptr)
    virtual ~HillshadeRenderer() override
    double altitude() const
    double azimuth() const
    int outputBitDepth() const
    double pixelSizeFactor() const
    double pixelSizePower() const
    Esri::ArcGISRuntime::SlopeType slopeType() const
    double zFactor() const

    Detailed Description

    A hillshade renderer can help visualize raster data using RasterLayer. Also known as shaded relief, a hillshade is a grayscale representation of a 3D surface, with the light source's specified angle used for shading the image.

    Note: HillshadeRenderer can be applied to a RasterLayer created with single band raster data. For a multi-band raster data, RGBRenderer might be a better fit.

    // Apply the hillshade renderer to the raster layer
    constexpr double altitude = 45.0;
    constexpr double azimuth = 315.0;
    constexpr double zFactor = 0.000016;
    constexpr SlopeType slopeType = SlopeType::None;
    constexpr double pixelSizeFactor = 1.0;
    constexpr double pixelSizePower = 1.0;
    constexpr int outputBitDepth = 8;
    HillshadeRenderer* hillshadeRenderer = new HillshadeRenderer(altitude, azimuth, zFactor, slopeType, pixelSizeFactor, pixelSizePower, outputBitDepth, this);
    m_rasterLayer->setRenderer(hillshadeRenderer);

    Member Function Documentation

    HillshadeRenderer::HillshadeRenderer(double altitude, double azimuth, double zFactor, Esri::ArcGISRuntime::SlopeType slopeType, double pixelSizeFactor, double pixelSizePower, int outputBitDepth, QObject *parent = nullptr)

    Constructor that takes the following parameters:

    • altitude - The light's angle of elevation above the horizon.
    • azimuth - The light's relative angle along the horizon measured clockwise, where 0 is north.
    • zFactor - The z-factor used to convert z unit to x,y units.
    • slopeType - The SlopeType.
    • pixelSizeFactor - The pixel size factor to account altitude changes as the viewer zooms.
    • pixelSizePower - The pixel size power to account altitude changes as the viewer zooms.
    • outputBitDepth - The output bit depth.
    • parent - The optional parent.

    HillshadeRenderer::HillshadeRenderer(double altitude, double azimuth, double zFactor, QObject *parent = nullptr)

    Constructor that takes the following parameters:

    • altitude - The light's angle of elevation above the horizon.
    • azimuth - The light's relative angle along the horizon measured clockwise, where 0 is north.
    • zFactor - The z-factor used to convert z unit to x,y units.
    • parent - The optional parent.

    HillshadeRenderer::HillshadeRenderer(QObject *parent = nullptr)

    Default constructor with an optional parent.

    The default values are:

    [override virtual] HillshadeRenderer::~HillshadeRenderer()

    Destructor.

    double HillshadeRenderer::altitude() const

    Returns the sun's angle of elevation above the horizon and ranges from 0 to 90 degrees.

    A value of 0 degrees indicates that the sun is on the horizon, that is, on the same horizontal plane as the frame of reference. A value of 90 degrees indicates that the sun is directly overhead. Together the altitude and azimuth indicate the sun's relative position.

    The default value is 45 degrees.

    double HillshadeRenderer::azimuth() const

    Returns the sun's relative position along the horizon (in degrees).

    This position is indicated by the angle of the sun measured clockwise from due north. An azimuth of 0 degrees indicates north, east is 90 degrees, south is 180 degrees, and west is 270 degrees.

    The default is 315 degrees.

    int HillshadeRenderer::outputBitDepth() const

    Returns the bit depth (pixel depth) of a raster cell.

    Determines the range of values that a particular raster can store, which is based on the formula 2n (where n is the bit depth). For example, an 8-bit raster can have 256 unique values that range from 0 to 255.

    The default bit depth is 8.

    double HillshadeRenderer::pixelSizeFactor() const

    Returns the pixel size factor.

    Pixel size factor and pixel size power allow nonlinear adjustments to be made to elevation scaling. This is typically recommended when working with world-wide datasets projected using World Mercator. These values adjust the zFactor as follows:

    Adjusted ZFactor = (ZFactor) + (PixelSize)^PixelSizePower * (PixelSizeFactor)

    The default value is 1.

    double HillshadeRenderer::pixelSizePower() const

    Returns the pixel size power.

    Pixel size factor and pixel size power allow nonlinear adjustments to be made to elevation scaling. This is typically recommended when working with world-wide datasets projected using World Mercator. These values adjust the zFactor as follows:

    Adjusted ZFactor = (ZFactor) + (PixelSize)^PixelSizePower * (PixelSizeFactor)

    The default value is 1.

    Esri::ArcGISRuntime::SlopeType HillshadeRenderer::slopeType() const

    Returns the manner in which inclination of the slope is calculated.

    The default is SlopeType::None.

    double HillshadeRenderer::zFactor() const

    Returns a scaling factor.

    This is used to convert the elevation values for two purposes:

    • To convert the elevation units (such as meters or feet) to the horizontal coordinate units (x,y) of the dataset, which may be feet, meters, or degrees.
    • To add vertical exaggeration for visual effect.

    If the x,y units and z units are in the same units of measure the z-factor is 1, unless a vertical exaggeration needs to be applied. If the x,y units and z units are in different units of measure the z-factor must be set to the appropriate factor, or the results will be incorrect. For example, if your z units are feet and your x,y units are meters, you would use a z-factor of 0.3048 to convert your z units from feet to meters (1 foot = 0.3048 meter).

    The default value is 1.

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